Vanderbilt University
Institute of Imaging Science
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Friday
31
January
2003
1:00pm
Seong-Gi Kim, PhD
High Resolution fMRI at High Magnetic Fields
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
28
March
2003
1:00pm
Michael Welch, PhD
Washington University
Advances in PET Imaging: From Mouse to Man
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
25
April
2003
1:00pm
Rod Pettigrew, MD, PhD
Director, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
23
May
2003
1:00pm
Robert Gillies, PhD
University of Arizona
Causes and Consequences of the Hostile Tumor Microenvironment
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Tuesday
02
March
2004
1:00pm
Richard Hargreaves, PhD
Merck, Inc
Imaging in Neuroscience Drug Discovery and Development
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
26
March
2004
1:00pm
Carl Jaffe
National Cancer Institute
Quantitative Imaging in Cancer Drug Trials
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
23
April
2004
1:00pm
Jeff Alger, PhD
Diffusion and Perfusion MRI Studies of Human Stroke
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
07
May
2004
1:00pm
Sharmila Majumdar, PhD
University of California, San Francisco
Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Articular Cartilage and Bone
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
25
February
2005
1:00pm
Peter Burns, PhD
University of Toronto
Imaging Angiogenesis with Ultrasound and Microbubbles
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
29
April
2005
1:00pm
David Piwnica-Worms, MD, PhD
Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO
Imaging Signal Transduction and Protein-Protein Interactions In Vivo with Genetically Encoded Reporters
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
23
September
2005
1:00pm
Felix Wehrli, PhD
University of Pennsylvania
Structural NMR Imaging: from Submillimeter to Micrometer Resolution
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
24
February
2006
1:00pm
Jeffrey Evelhoch, PhD
Director of Imaging in the Medical Science Department Amgen, Inc.
Imaging as a Biomarker for Development of Human Therapeutics
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
31
March
2006
1:00pm
Zaver Bhujawaller, PhD
Johns Hopkins University
MR Molecular and Functional Imaging of Cancer
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
15
September
2006
1:00pm
Barry Horwitz, PhD
National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders, NIH
Using Neural Modeling and Functional Neuroimaging to Study the Neural Basis of Auditory and Visual Object Processing
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
13
October
2006
1:00pm
Bruce J. Tromberg, PhD
Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California
Medical Imaging in Thick Tissues Using Diffuse Optics
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
15
December
2006
1:00pm
Keith D. Paulsen
Thayer School of Engineering Dartmouth College
Imaging the Breast with Alternatives to Standard Practice
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
19
January
2007
1:00pm
Robert L. Sah, MD, ScD
University of California, San Diego
Bioengineering Articular Cartilage and Synovial Joints   (more ...)
Bioengineering Articular Cartilage and Synovial Joints   (hide ...)

The synovial joint is the most common type of joint in the body. Such a joint consists of a synovium-lined cavity containing synovial fluid that separates articulating cartilage-covered bones. Often, such joints are functional for a lifetime, with the synovial fluid-bathed articular cartilage providing surfaces that are low-friction, wear-resistant, and load-bearing. In adults, damaged articular cartilage does not heal effectively after injury, and a common aging-associated malady is osteoarthritis with progressive cartilage deterioration.
The synovial fluid has high concentrations of lubricant molecules, facilitating low friction and low wear of articular cartilage. Boundary-mode friction tests and accelerated wear tests of articulating cartilage surfaces demonstrate these roles for synovial fluid. Lubricant molecule components of synovial fluid that lower friction in the boundary mode are proteoglycan-4 and hyaluronan. Such lubricant molecules can be synthesized by cartilage and synovium.
One structural feature of articular cartilage is the location and organization of the indwelling chondrocytes. Chondrocytes are present at a density that decreases with depth from the articular surface. The density of chondrocytes also decreases with normal aging. In osteoarthritis, brood clones can lead to a normalization of cell density, although the organization of cells within cartilage may remain deranged. Such cellular features of cartilage can be delineated by 3-D histological methods.
To fabricate and maintain whole biological joints ex vivo, an appropriate interaction of cartilage, synovium, and synovial fluid components appears critical. Mechanobiological effects and interactions in joints normally result in a high concentration of lubricant molecules, while providing for nutrient exchange. Dynamic compressive and shear loads applied to cartilage stimulate secretion of load-bearing matrix and friction-lowering lubricant, respectively. An inter-compartmental model highlights such interactions and can be used to select component parameters for testing fabricated joints ex vivo. A joint-scale bioreactor has been developed and shows the ability to maintain whole joints with viable articular cartilage that is responsive to its mechanical environment.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Thursday
03
May
2007
1:00pm
Harvey R. Herschman, PhD
University of California, Los Angeles
Non-invasive imaging of tumor progression, targeting, and therapy
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
25
April
2008
1:00pm
Tuan Vo-Dinh, PhD
Duke University
Nanosensors and Nanoprobes: Challenges and Potential at the Frontiers of Biomedical Photonics   (more ...)
Nanosensors and Nanoprobes: Challenges and Potential at the Frontiers of Biomedical Photonics   (hide ...)

This lecture presents an overview of recent advances in the development of nanosensors and nanoprobes at the nexus of biology, medicine and nanotechnology. This presentation describes two areas of research related to the development of nanoprobes and nanosensors for single-cell analysis and imaging: (1) plasmonics ‚??molecular sentinel‚?Ě nanoprobes using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection, and (2) nanosensors for in vivo analysis of a single cell for molecular diagnostics and imaging, and ultra-high throughput screening. A new generation of nanosensors and nanoprobes combining bio-recognition and nanotechnology has been developed for in vivo monitoring of biochemical processes in a single living cell. This technique could provide unprecedented insights into intact cell function, allowing, for the first time, studies of molecular functions in the context of the functional cell architecture in an integrated system approach. These studies demonstrate the first applications of plasmonics ‚??molecular sentinel‚?Ě nanoprobes for diagnostics of diseases such as HIV, and cancer; and the use of nano-biosensors for measurements of molecular signaling pathways inside a single cell. These nanodevices could also be used to develop advanced biosensing and bioimaging systems in order to study in situ intracellular signaling processes and to study gene expression and molecular processes inside individual living cells. Such nanoprobes open new horizons to a host of applications in molecular imaging, biology research, medical diagnostics, ultra-high throughput screening, and investigations of the therapeutic action of pharmaceutical agents.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
30
May
2008
1:00pm
John Boone, PhD
University of California, Davis
Breast Computed Tomography as a Platform for Diagnosis and Treatment of Breast Cancer
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
26
September
2008
1:00pm
Martin G. Pomper, MD, PhD
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Translational Molecular Imaging   (more ...)
Translational Molecular Imaging   (hide ...)

Although most clinical diagnostic imaging studies employ anatomic techniques such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, much of radiology research currently focuses on adapting these conventional methods to physiologic imaging as well as on introducing new techniques and probes for studying processes at the cellular and molecular levels in vivo, i.e. molecular imaging. Molecular imaging promises to provide new methods for the early detection of disease and support for personalized therapy. Although molecular imaging has been practiced in various incarnations for over 20 years in the context of nuclear medicine, other imaging modalities have only recently been applied to the noninvasive assessment of physiology and molecular events. Nevertheless, there has been sufficient experience with specifically targeted contrast agents and high-resolution techniques for MR imaging and other modalities that we must begin moving these new technologies from the laboratory to the clinic. This brief overview will outline molecular imaging from probe development to clinical translation, with a focus on translational (small animal) and early clinical imaging. We will discuss the ability for molecular imaging to assess specific signal transduction cascades, which are increasingly the targets of newer, cytostatic therapeutic agents, and provide examples of how existing or readily accessible molecular tracers and techniques can provide insight into rather complex biological phenomena in vivo.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
03
October
2008
1:00pm
Bruce R. Rosen, MD, PhD

Harvard Medical School,
Director, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital

Multimodal Neuroimaging of the Brain   (more ...)
Multimodal Neuroimaging of the Brain   (hide ...)

The last decade has brought revolutionary new techniques allowing visualization of the working brain in humans at the systems level. However, a large gap remains between the spatiotemporal resolution of today‚??s tomographic techniques (e.g. fMRI), and methods to address underlying electrophysiologic and neurochemical actions required for a more complete understanding of brain function. This talk will discuss several key neuroimaging technologies to help bridge this critical gap. New methods are being developed to allow the direct visualization of animal and human neural systems organization from the systems level to the columnar level (<100 micron), with temporal resolution from hundreds down to milliseconds. Four key technologies will be discussed: (1) extremely high resolution MRI and fMRI, using very high strength gradients, phased-array coils, and other advances at 3T and 7T; (2) Combined PET/MRI imaging, for simultaneous mapping of cerebral physiology and neurochemistry (3) tomographic optical imaging, increasing the resolution and physiological range in vivo using diffuse optical tomography; and (4) high resolution EEG/MEG arrays, and associated analytic and modeling approaches to integrate these data with other methods. Each of these technologies is designed to allow us to explore another dimension in the three dimensional space of ‚??where‚?Ě, ‚??what‚?Ě and ‚??when‚?Ě regarding brain function, and explore spatiotemporal and neurochemical domains that have not heretofore been addressable non-invasively.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
27
March
2009
1:00pm
Terry Peters, PhD
Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario
Virtual Reality Assisted Therapy of the Brain and Heart   (more ...)
Virtual Reality Assisted Therapy of the Brain and Heart   (hide ...)

Surgical procedures often have the unfortunate side-effect of causing the patient significant trauma while accessing the target site. Indeed, in some cases the trauma inflicted on the patient during access to the target greatly exceeds that caused by performing the therapy. We have developed techniques for performing minimally-invasive surgery on the brain and heart that rely on pre-operative images, combined with data acquired during the procedure. This presentation will illustrate this work with respect to its application for both deep-brain stimulator implantation as well as intra-cardiac therapy. For deep-brain therapy for Parkinson's tremor, we map a database of deep-brain electrophysiological responses to the patient's brain. Guided by these data and intra-operatively acquired electrophysiology measurements, the target region is approached with a stimulating electrode through a small burr-hole in the skull to select the final target. In the heart, many intra-cardiac interventions are currently performed after the chest has been opened, the patient placed on cardiopulmonary bypass, and the heart arrested. Our approach is to register intra-operative images to the patient and use a navigation system that combines intra-operative ultrasound with virtual models of instrumentation that has been introduced into the chamber through the heart wall.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
12
March
2010
1:00pm
Richard L. Ehman
Mayo Clinci
Magnetic Resonance Elastography: A New Touch in Medical Imaging
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
21
May
2010
1:00pm
Paul A. Dayton
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University, Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering
Advances in Technology for Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
24
February
2012
1:00pm
Ravinder Reddy
University of Pennsylvania
High Resolution Imaging of Glutamate   (more ...)
High Resolution Imaging of Glutamate   (hide ...)

Glutamate is one of the major excitatory neurotransmitters in the brain and is likely involved in nearly all signal-processing functions of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as being altered in many CNS diseases. While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is noninvasive and provides high resolution and exquisite structural details, existing MRI methods are not capable of imaging the distribution of neurotransmitters in the brain. Functional MRI (fMRI) provides information based on changes in blood flow and metabolism, but lacks the sensitivity and specificity to probe these neurotransmitters. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1HMRS), on the other hand, can detect glutamate signature groups using a variety of techniques. However, 1HMRS techniques require long acquisition times and have poor spatial resolution. In this presentation, we will describe a novel MRI technique for imaging glutamate (GluCEST) that provides markedly increased spatial and temporal resolution than 1HMRS. The method exploits the glutamate amine exchange saturation transfer to bulk water. Specifically, preliminary results of pH and concentration dependence of GluCEST in physiological phantoms and animal models will be described. Feasibility of obtaining GluCEST maps from human brain at 7 Tesla, as well as potential overlap form other brain metabolites will be discussed.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
13
April
2012
1:00pm
Daniel Sodickson
New York University
Unexpected Tomography: New Coils, New Computations, and New Contrast for MRI
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
31
May
2013
1:00pm
Fahmeed Hyder
Yale University
Quantitative basis for neuroimaging of cortical laminae with calibrated fMRI   (more ...)
Quantitative basis for neuroimaging of cortical laminae with calibrated fMRI   (hide ...)

Layer-specific neurophysiologic, hemodynamic, and metabolic measurements are needed to interpret high-resolution fMRI data in the cerebral cortex. We examined how neurovascular and neurometabolic couplings vary vertically in the rat‚??s somatosensory cortex. During sensory stimulation we measured dynamic layer-specific responses of (LFP) and multi-unit activity (MUA) as well as blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal, blood volume (CBV) and blood flow (CBF) and which in turn were used to calculate changes in oxidative metabolism (CMRO2) with calibrated fMRI. Both BOLD and CBV decreased from superficial to deep laminae, but these responses were not well correlated with either layer-specific LFP or MUA. However CBF was stable across laminae similar to LFP. But CMRO2 and MUA varied across cortex in a correlated manner and both were reduced in superficial lamina. These results lay the framework for quantitative neuroimaging across cortical laminae with calibrated fMRI methods.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
01
November
2013
1:00pm
Seong-Gi Kim
University of Pittsburgh
Chemical Exchange Sensitive MRI: Signal sources and sensitivity
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
31
January
2014
1:00pm
Lawrence Wald, Ph.D.
Massachusetts General Hospital
New Directions for Brain MRI Hardware
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
28
March
2014
1:00pm
Samuel Achilefu, Ph.D.
Washington University
Molecular Fluorescence Image-Guided Cancer Resection: From Bench to Bedside
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
06
February
2015
1:00pm
Hollis G. Potter, MD
Hospital for Special Surgery
The MRI Lab at HSS: Preclinical (and clinical) Orthopaedic Research in a Clinical Environment - From parametric mapping to imaging around metal   (more ...)
The MRI Lab at HSS: Preclinical (and clinical) Orthopaedic Research in a Clinical Environment - From parametric mapping to imaging around metal   (hide ...)

Recent developments in parametric mapping have enabled the non-invasive interrogation of articular cartilage, fibrocartilage, and ligament, yielding independent assessment of collagen orientation and proteoglycan. This has improved the ability to assess tissue engineered constructs as well as provide preliminary data correlating to functional capacity of soft tissue. The utility of such imaging in a clinic is largely to investigate cohorts at risk for development of early osteoarthritis such as hip femoroacetabular impingement, but also to assess to the efficacy of the cartilage repair using either scaffold or cell based constructs. Despite surgical interventions and these tissue repair techniques, the incident of joint replacement as a treatment for end stage osteoarthritis is increasing. To that end, techniques that reduce susceptibility artifact and generate clinically relevant data around orthopedic implants are necessary. Data will be presented demonstrating the utility of MRI as a biomarker in assessing adverse tissue to reaction to implants.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
27
May
2016
1:00pm
Bernd Pichler, PhD
University of Tubingen
PET/MRI: Multiparametric Imaging in Preclinical and Translational Research   (more ...)
PET/MRI: Multiparametric Imaging in Preclinical and Translational Research   (hide ...)

Combined PET/MRI technologies have matured over the last years and have found their places as emerging tools in preclinical and clinical research. Our aim is to exploit the potential of PET/MR in various fields of biomedical research focusing on imaging of immune cell trafficking, cancer research, neurodegeneration and infectious diseases. The wealth of multiparametric morphological, functional and molecular information provided by PET/MR requires advanced methods of image data analysis and data mining. One of our approaches is to combine in vivo imaging data with omics information which links imaging science and the powerful disciplines of omics and bioinformatics.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
14
April
2017
1:00pm
Joseph Ackerman, PhD
William Greenleaf Eliot Professor
Professor, Dept. of Chemisty
Washington University in St. Louis
Probing Living Systems with Magnetic Resonance: Four Vignettes in Neurobiology and an Un-Murder Mystery   (more ...)
Probing Living Systems with Magnetic Resonance: Four Vignettes in Neurobiology and an Un-Murder Mystery   (hide ...)

∑ A mouse model of single-hemispheric delayed/late time-to-onset radiation necrosis (RN), which recapitulates the entire gestalt of clinical signatures, has been developed employing the Leksell Gamma“ Knife PerfexionTM (192 60Co radiation sources: 0.5 mm targeting accuracy). MRI detection of the onset and quantification of the extent of RN in this mouse model has been validated by correlative histology. ∑ This preclinical model provides a powerful platform to evaluate therapies (drugs) that hold promise to protect and/or mitigate against RN. Additionally, implanting tumor cells in the irradiated tissue bed provides a model of recurrent cancer post-irradiation, an important clinical challenge in the post-treatment (resectionģchemotherapyģradiation) management of patients with brain tumors. ∑ Tissue pO2 (dissolved O2 content) is a critical determinant of cellular function and its direct quantification by MRI would be a major advance. O2 is weakly paramagnetic and, thus, affects tissue water 1H MR relaxation. Therefore, in principle, it should be possible to convert a map of 1H MR longitudinal (spin lattice) relaxation times directly to a map of tissue pO2. In practice, competing relaxation effects require mitigation ∑ MRI signal models are often based on multi-compartment tissue models that postulate compartment specific biophysical and/or MR properties for water in the intracellular vs. extracellular spaces. Such descriptions generally assume that water exchange between compartments is slow relative to the MR experimental time scale. The average residence times (preexchange lifetimes) for intracellular water in neurons and glia cells have been determined from water 1H MR longitudinal relaxation experiments with a perfused ?Brains-on-Beads? model system. ∑ Finally, if time allows, 31P NMR in vivo will be used to resolve a mystery in which the crime was a murder that did not happen, an un-murder mystery!
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
27
March
2020
1:00pm
Canceled
NULL
Founder Series, MRBIII Lecture Hall Room 1220