Vanderbilt University
Institute of Imaging Science
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Tuesday
30
September
2014
12:00pm
Dr. Shane Hutso
Vanderbilt University
Imaging, Image Analysis, and Optical Manipulation of Cellular Mechanics in Early Embryogenesis
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Tuesday
28
October
2014
12:00pm
Dr. Paul Compagnola
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Imaging and Modeling the ECM in Ovarian Cancer
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Tuesday
11
November
2014
12:00pm
Dr. H. Philip Stahl
SPIE, NASA
Rules for Optical Testing **Room Change: Light Hall 202 **
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202Light Hall 202
Tuesday
02
December
2014
12:00pm
Dr. Ed Gooding or Dr. Jason McClure
Princeton Instruments
TBA
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Monday
14
September
2015
12:00pm
Anita Mahadevan-Jansen, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
TBD
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Monday
05
October
2015
12:00pm
Eric R. Tkaczyk, M.D., Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
Emerging Diagnostic Optical Technologies for Dermatology   (more ...)
Emerging Diagnostic Optical Technologies for Dermatology   (hide ...)

Optical engineering has seen revolutionary developments during past decades as evidenced by Nobel Prizes focused on light science and technology in Chemistry and Physics last year. For the application of new imaging techniques, the specialty of dermatology is particularly well-positioned. Accordingly, a large number of optical diagnostic products have recently emerged on the market to assist dermatologists in their clinical decision-making. The possibilities and pitfalls of these various technologies stem from the fundamentally different underlying physical principles. This discussion will provide a broad overview of both the principles and present state of clinical art for four of the seven major noninvasive optical techniques being advanced for dermatology today.
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Monday
12
October
2015
12:00pm
Xingde Li, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University
Label-free Optical Micro Imaging of Tissue Histology in vivo
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Monday
02
November
2015
12:00pm
Vasan Venugopalan, Sc.D.
University of California, Irvine
Laser-Generated Microtsunamis for Targeted Cell Lysis, Molecular Delivery and Mechanotransduction    (more ...)
Laser-Generated Microtsunamis for Targeted Cell Lysis, Molecular Delivery and Mechanotransduction    (hide ...)

Pulsed laser microbeam irradiation provides powerful tool for cell manipulation and modification due to its ability to deposit energy with high spatial localization. Often, such irradiation leads to plasma formation. Apart from free electron generation, plasma formation often results in local vaporization, shock wave emission, and cavitation bubble formation, expansion, and collapse. Our research has shown that when using nanosecond and picosecond laser pulses at visible and NIR wavelengths the stress waves produced by the cavitation bubble dynamics, which we term microtsunamis, are principally responsible for the resulting cellular effects. First, I will discuss the uses of laser-generated microtsunamis in standard applications of targeted cell lysis and optoporation. Second, I will provide results demonstrating the ability of laser-generated microtsunamis to stimulate cellular mechanotransduction and motivate potential applications for high throughput drug screening and basic biological studies. In both instances, I will illustrate the value of quantitative modeling as a means to connect the applied physical perturbations to cellular responses.

Bio: Vasan Venugopalan is Professor and Chair of the Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science at the University of California, Irvine. He also holds joint appointments in the Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, and Beckman Laser Institute & Medical Clinic at UCI. His lab focuses on basic and applied research regarding the uses of pulsed laser microbeams in cell biology and biotechnology as well as the development of novel, open-source, computational tools to model light transport in cells and tissues. He has published over 60 peer-reviewed papers. He also serves Associate Editor of the OSA journals Optics Express (2009-present) and Biomedical Optics Express (2010-present).
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Monday
09
November
2015
12:00pm
Andrew Dunn, Ph.D.
Professor and Interim Chair, Department of Biomedical Engineering,
Director of Center for Emerging Imaging Technologies
University of Texas, Austin
Optical Tools for High Resolution Imaging of Cerebral Hemodynamics   (more ...)
Optical Tools for High Resolution Imaging of Cerebral Hemodynamics   (hide ...)

During ischemic stroke, oxygen delivery in interrupted to a region of the brain resulting in a complex cascade of hemodynamic and cellular events that ultimately leads to cell death and tissue damage. Although recent advances in high resolution in vivo imaging have enabled some aspects of this cascade to be visualized dynamically, the detailed changes in blood flow and oxygenation during stroke remain poorly understood. This talk will describe two new developments in optical imaging techniques for high resolution imaging of cortical hemodynamics and their application to animal models of stroke and clinical translation to neurosurgery. The first, laser speckle contrast imaging, enables real-time visualization of blood flow during neurosurgery, monitoring of clot formation in animal models of stroke, and chronic tracking of blood flow changes to assess recovery from brain injury. The second, two-photon phosphorescence lifetime microscopy, allows determination of oxygen levels in single, subsurface blood vessels with three-dimensional micron scale resolution. When combined together, these imaging methods provide unprecedented levels of in vivo information about the microvascular alterations in the brain following diseases such as stroke.
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Monday
30
November
2015
12:00pm
Madan Jagasia, M.D.
Vanderbilt University
TBD
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Monday
14
December
2015
12:00pm
Mark Canales
Field Applications Specialist (Life Science)
Spectroscopy Products Division
Introduction to bio-Raman applications: cells, tissues and diagnostics   (more ...)
Introduction to bio-Raman applications: cells, tissues and diagnostics   (hide ...)

Abstract: Raman microscopy has become a routine tool for many materials, but the need for this molecular imaging and analysis technique in biological research has become essential. The ability to probe the chemical and molecular structure of biological materials is obtained directly without the need for any dyes or markers. These systems can be utilized to generate chemical images of cells, tissue, bone and bio-compatible materials with very high spatial resolution. It has been employed for cancer diagnosis, stem cell differentiation, skin treatments, protein structure analysis, bio-diagnostics, and bacterial identification. This Raman instrumentation can also be combined with environmental chambers, scanning probe techniques, scanning electron microscopes and in-vivo probes; to provide in-situ and co-localized measurements. This talk will provide an introduction to Raman microscopy with biological materials; the instrumentation required for these techniques; and, will highlight some applications where Raman microscopy is making the biggest impact with biological materials.
Bio: Mark Canales is a Life Science Application Scientist with Renishaw?s Raman Spectroscopy division. He joined Renishaw/Renishaw Diagnostics in 2012 with over 15 years of industry experience in applications scientific support, technical support training, and project management. Prior to working at Renishaw, Mark was a Senior Scientist supporting GE Healthcare?s Genomics/CodeLink Microarray portfolio. Mark has held Senior Application Scientist?s roles at Aperio (Leica), Amersham Biosciences, and Molecular Dynamics.
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Monday
28
March
2016
1:00pm
Melanie McWade, M.S.
Biomedical Engineering Dissertation Defense
Development of an INtraoperative Tool to Detect Parathyroid Gland Autofluorescence   (more ...)
Development of an INtraoperative Tool to Detect Parathyroid Gland Autofluorescence   (hide ...)

The inability to identify the parathyroid glands is a significant challenge during endocrine surgery. Successful parathyroid and thyroid surgeries require careful resection of diseased tissue and preservation of normal tissues, but this is not always the reality. Inaccurate localization of parathyroid glands during these procedures may permanently prevent patients from achieving normal calcium levels after surgery. Current parathyroid detection methods cannot convey real-time information and are limited to localization of only diseased glands. There is, therefore, a large unmet need in endocrine surgery for a technique to find diseased and normal parathyroid glands during surgery. Previous studies have observed an intrinsic near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence signal in the parathyroid gland that is higher than the fluorescence of surrounding neck tissues. The goal of this dissertation is to develop NIR fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging into a reliable, real-time tool for parathyroid detection regardless of disease state. Studies were also performed to understand the biological basis of the NIR autofluorescence signal. This dissertation work is aimed at lowering the barrier for clinical translation of the technology. Widespread adoption of NIR fluorescence detection of the parathyroid glands will greatly improve patient care by reducing harmful surgical complications.
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Thursday
19
November
2020
1:00pm
Bruce Tromberg Ph.D.
Director, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering
BIOENGINEERING FOR COVID-19: RAPID ACCELERATION OF DIAGNOSTICS (RADX) AT UNPRECEDENTED SPEED AND SCALE   (more ...)
BIOENGINEERING FOR COVID-19: RAPID ACCELERATION OF DIAGNOSTICS (RADX) AT UNPRECEDENTED SPEED AND SCALE   (hide ...)

The NIH Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx) initiative was launched on April 29, 2020, just 5 days after a Congressional directive to expand the number and type of SARS-CoV2 diagnostic technologies. Four NIH RADx programs now support technology development and delivery. This talk introduces principles of the RADx Tech 'innovation funnel' designed to evaluate, validate, and scale up promising technologies for laboratory, point of care, and home settings. More than 700 applications were submitted to the funnel and reviewed on a rolling basis over a three month period. As of early October, 46 projects were selected for phase 1 funding to validate and de-risk technologies; 22 projects received phase 2 contracts totaling $480M to support manufacturing expansion and clinical studies. Current phase 2 platforms are projected to add >2.5M tests/day by December 2020. RADx has accelerated SARS-CoV2 test development by compressing the typical multi-year tech commercialization process into 5-6 months. As technologies in the pipeline continue to be developed, RADx, combined with multiple public and private sector expansion efforts, is anticipated to contribute to the production of >6M tests/day in the U.S. by the end of 2020.
https://www.vumc.org/dls/
other_Discovery_Lecture, Discovery Lecture